Top 7 Instructional Design Principles in 2022 by@onyawoibi

Top 7 Instructional Design Principles in 2022

As an instructional designer, the goal is to ensure learning occurs. The creation, development and evaluation of everything that is created is guided by certain principles of instructional design. To create an effective learning experience that appeals to all learners, we must first determine their specific learning needs. This will determine the learning materials and class activities the instructional designer develops. To accelerate learning, use small units. Consider the backgrounds of your students when creating materials; Include supplemental materials and remedial materials for students who are struggling;Provide Structure Using A Clear, Organized Format.
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Celine Aju

Script Writer @ Street School Education Tutor Experience Manager @ Tuteria


As an instructional designer, the goal is to ensure learning occurs. In order to achieve this aim, we adopt different models of instructional design, employ different types of media and develop a variety of learning materials. Certain principles of instructional design guide the creation, development, and evaluation of everything that is created.

Table of Contents:

  1. Top 7 Principles of instructional design

a. Identify Learner Requirements

b. Use a pre-test, and get all of your students on the same page.

c. Inform Learners of the objectives

d. Ensure learning occurs at a controlled pace. Design Your Course to be learner-centered f. Include opportunities for students to produce original content

g. Assess Performance

h. Provide feedback to your learners

  1. Other Principles of Instructional Design

a. Roger Schank’s goal-based learning

3. Always Remember Gagne's 9 Principles

Top 7 principles of Instructional Design

a. Identify Learner Requirements


Every student is different. Some learn by seeing or doing while others learn by reading. To create an effective learning experience that appeals to all learners, we must first determine their specific learning needs. This will determine the learning materials and class activities the instructional designer develops. When applying this principle, these are some crucial metrics to take into consideration: The format of the course will be provided to the learners, The type of activities the learners will engage in, and course completion criteria and the metric for measuring learning.


b. Use a pre-test


Get all of your students on the same page. Before beginning a course, we will use pre-tests to assess learner knowledge. Respond to learners' level of comprehension and tailor the course to their requirements based on the results of this quiz. The score also aids us in determining whether learners should be directed to an advanced-level course or expert-led hands-on training.

A pre-test can assist inspire students by instilling a desire to learn. It enables students to comprehend what they know and don't know. This knowledge will motivate students to enroll in the course. It prepares them by giving them a preview of what's to come and what they should be aware of while taking the course.


c. Inform Learners of the objectives


Communicating goals demonstrates to your students "what's in it for me," or WIIFM. Declaring learning objectives in advance illustrates the value-add that your course provides and assists the course participant in setting expectations for what is to come.

Ensure learning occurs at a controlled pace.


Because kids require a lot of practice to master a skill, an instructional program should present material quickly and encourage students to practice whenever they can. This applies to both eLearning and on-site programs. Effective Instructional Design requires getting students swiftly to a point where they can begin to apply what they've learned.


d. Five methods for creating and implementing a paced learning plan:


Consider the backgrounds of your students when creating materials; Include supplemental materials and remedial materials for students who are struggling; provide structure using a clear, organized Format; and to accelerate learning, use small units.


e. Design Your Course to be learner-centered


Learners conduct more investigating, and educators do less telling in student-centered instruction. After all, the goal is to turn students into ACTIVE participants. Instructors or trainers are still a necessity. They are, nevertheless, expected to act as a facilitator, guiding pupils in the acquisition of knowledge and the application of newly gained abilities.


f. Include opportunities for students to produce original content


Students are harmed by a course that only demands them to recall material to spit out in a tightly controlled environment, such as a multiple-choice test or fill-in-the-blank. Instead, offer chances for students to create unique content as part of the course format.

Producing original content can be achieved through some of these methods:


  • Asking students to express their reactions to the positions offered in the assigned reading after completing a reading assignment, a video assignment, or another exercise.
  • Encouraging students to use their newly acquired knowledge or skills outside of the classroom;
  • Teaching students to look for contradictions, explanations, and solutions;
  • Creating courses that teach students to never accept the status quo and to always ask questions in order to become lifelong learners.


g. Assess Performance


This principle encourages students to reflect on what they've learned. It's worth noting that the focus of correct or incorrect answer feedback should be on reinforcing learning. Use learning games, word puzzles, drag-and-drop interactions, flashcards, or scenario activities to make your exams interactive and interesting. Depending on the learning objectives, you may want to give your students a second chance to complete the evaluation.


h. Provide Feedback to your learners


In a training program, immediate feedback serves three key purposes:


  • Corrects the student.
  • The learner's information is reinforced.
  • Corrects misconceptions among students


Here are some suggestions for providing successful feedback: Provide it right away. This will enable students to quickly see their errors and respond to constructive criticism. Using scenarios and case studies, show students the real-world consequences of their poor decisions. Rather than limiting feedback to what the issue is, explain how learners can correct an error in their activity, skill, or behavior. Align comments to our course's aims and objectives, emphasizing how correcting an error contributes to the broader goal of the course.

Other Instructional Design Principles

Roger Schank’s goal-based learning

This is an immersive strategy based on the "learning by failure" philosophy. It focuses on significant errors and employs a variety of material forms, including case-based simulations. The designer creates a scenario in which the learner is permitted to make a mistake. Before getting tutoring or mentoring, the student will be unable to continue with the program. When he or she returns, he or she hopes to avoid making the same error, and therefore proceeds through the scenario. Because the student is only examined when he makes a mistake, this strategy works well for autonomous learners and can provide a quick way to gain learning.


Create a Narrative

Create a unified flow for the learning experience by using a story or scenario. This is accomplished by developing characters and making dramatic modifications over each module/section. This enhances comprehension by keeping the learner's attention.


Set Time expectations

Time expectations are always determined based on the complexity of the lesson, the newness of the topic, and student participation. This aids students' concentration. It also prevents overloading of information.

Always Remember Gagne’s 9 Principles

When applying the top 7 instructional design principles remember Gagne’s 9 Principles. Gagne's nine processes ignore the wider picture of ID, such as determining the objectives, detailing the content based on the objectives, choosing the best media, developing an evaluation approach, and so on. When focusing on what the course would comprise from introduction to conclusion and follow-up after the course, Gagne's concepts are critical. Keep in mind that various learning experts' methodologies have their place.

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