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The United States of America v. Microsoft: Taking a Closer Look at Server Operating Systemsby@legalpdf

The United States of America v. Microsoft: Taking a Closer Look at Server Operating Systems

by Legal PDFAugust 25th, 2023
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United States Of America. v. Microsoft Corporation Court Filing by Thomas Penfield Jackson, November 5, 1999, is part of HackerNoon’s Legal PDF Series. This is part 4 of 57.

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United States Of America. v. Microsoft Corporation Court Filing by Thomas Penfield Jackson, November 5, 1999, is part of HackerNoon’s Legal PDF Series. You can jump to any part in this filing here. This is part 4 of 58.

A. Demand Substitutability

1. Server Operating Systems

19. Consumers could not turn from Intel-compatible PC operating systems to Intel-compatible server operating systems without incurring substantial costs, since the latter type of system is sold at a significantly higher price than the former.


A consumer intent on acquiring a server operating system would also have to buy a computer of substantially greater power and price than an Intel-compatible PC, because server operating systems generally cannot function properly on PC hardware.


The price of an Intel-compatible PC operating system accounts for only a very small percentage of the price of an Intel-compatible PC system. Thus, even a substantial increase in the price of an Intel-compatible PC operating system above the competitive level would result in only a trivial increase in the price of an Intel-compatible PC system.


Very few consumers would purchase expensive servers in response to a trivial increase in the price of an Intel-compatible PC system.


Furthermore, a consumer would not obtain a satisfactory substitute for an Intel-compatible PC operating system even if he purchased a server, since server operating systems lack the features — and support for the breadth of applications — that induce users to purchase Intel-compatible PC operating systems.

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This court case Civil Action No. 98-1232 (TPJ) retrieved on 1-19-2023, from justice.gov is part of the public domain. The court-created documents are works of the federal government, and under copyright law, are automatically placed in the public domain and may be shared without legal restriction.