The Best Cybersecurity Practices for Data Centres by@valeryyy

The Best Cybersecurity Practices for Data Centres

The rise in data usage and the exponential growth of remote work in recent years has increased the need for reliable data protection centers. Data centers are critical for wide-scale networking, data storage, and information sharing. Cybercrimes are getting more sophisticated and rely on social engineering attacks to infiltrate well-protected systems. As an IT administrator, you should ensure that all cybersecurity best practices and protocols are efficiently applied. A data breach can lead to the exposure or loss of sensitive information which can have a detrimental impact on an organization.
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Valery

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The rise in data usage and the exponential growth of remote work in recent years has increased the need for reliable data protection centers all around the world. Since data centers are critical for wide-scale networking, data storage, and information sharing, they require exceptional security measures to safeguard them from rapidly evolving physical and digital threats.

Read on to learn about the specifications of data center security and the risks that threaten it. Discover the cybersecurity best practices that you need to implement to ensure optimal protection.

What Is Data Center Security?

Data centers are centralized facilities with a large number of servers, networking equipment, and power systems that process, store and distribute business-critical data. Due to their complex and technical specifications, data centers require comprehensive security plans and extensive work to shield them from internal and external threats.

Nowadays, the vast majority of companies rely on a data center to safely share and store their data. Most modern businesses cannot complete their daily operations in case the data center is compromised. A data breach can lead to the exposure or loss of sensitive information which can have a detrimental impact on an organization.

That said, data center security is an essential practice that incorporates several data protection approaches that minimize the risk of unauthorized access and cyberattacks:

  • Physical security: This includes choosing a safe location and setting up physical access controls and barriers to secure the building and limit entry points.
  • Digital and network security: Protecting the IT infrastructure and servers by installing firewalls and anti-malware software.
  • Social engineering security: An often overlooked aspect of data center security that involves conducting employee training and awareness campaigns.

Common Threats and Vulnerabilities

The most common risks that endanger data center security are related to human error. Cybercrimes are getting more sophisticated and rely on social engineering attacks to infiltrate well-protected systems. Attackers tend to use malware to acquire sensitive information such as login credentials. Ransomware is also frequently used to obtain and lock business-critical data and then force a company to pay a ransom to regain access. Data centers are also a prime target for spoofing attacks in which the true source of malicious software is hidden to gain employee trust and bypass network security.


Using weak or recycled passwords across several applications is another human error. This makes it easier for attackers to crack employee accounts so they could view, modify or even delete company data. Such threats can severely impact a data center however, their risk can be mitigated with proper IT security education and ongoing training.


Poorly configured software, outdated security tools, and neglected network infrastructure are also a vulnerability. Cybercriminals continuously search for software loopholes that allow them to access, manipulate or exploit a program. As an IT administrator, you should ensure that all cybersecurity best practices and protocols are efficiently applied.

Physical Data Center Security

Data centers usually contain large amounts of sensitive equipment including servers, routers, switches as well as telecommunication and power supplies. Each appliance is crucial for the smooth operation of the entire infrastructure. With that in mind, you need to protect every item from various physical threats.


Start by establishing a secure location. You ought to set the data center in a region that is not frequently affected by natural disasters such as fires, earthquakes, and floods. You should try to minimize entry points and add physical barriers where necessary. It is highly recommended to create several access levels for different employees based on their security clearances. Inside the data center, you can use biometric scanners and install surveillance monitoring systems to track and record activity within the building.


Another component of physical data center security is redundancy. In case the primary appliance malfunctions or goes down, the secondary appliance can be automatically or manually activated to ensure operational consistency. This is especially important for core components such as power suppliers, network infrastructure, and cooling systems.

Digital and Virtual Data Center Security

A common practice in data center technology is virtualization which allows you to manage your software remotely. This leads to exponential data growth and increases the risks of data breaches or loss. In this case, digital and virtual protection is a necessity to protect your software from cybercrimes.


Follow the cybersecurity best practices listed below to safeguard your data:

  • Encrypt sensitive business data while sharing it (in flight) or in storage (at rest).
  • Use two-factor authentication (2FA) to protect user accounts.
  • Create unique, long, and complex passwords using numbers, letters, and symbols.
  • Purge email accounts and archive important messages in a secure repository.
  • Do not use unsecured WiFi connections to conduct business operations.
  • Install antivirus software and firewalls and keep them up to date.
  • Structure the network infrastructure and create different isolated segments.
  • Maintain your operating systems and keep them patched and up to date.
  • Conduct regular backups and store backed-up data separately from online systems.
  • Do not click on unknown links and attachments.
  • Do not download applications without verifying their source.

Regulatory and Legal Compliance

You should stay informed on your industry’s latest regulatory and legal requirements. The large growth of data centers led to the development of new local and international regulations. By adapting to these policies, you guarantee that vital data such as personal information, financial logs, and other business-sensitive data are optimally protected. In addition, adhering to regulatory compliance helps you avoid severe legal repercussions that could result in reputational damage or hefty fines.

Conclusion

Data centers are an intrinsic part of today’s data-intensive world. Organizations rely on them to share and store crucial business information. By effectively implementing all cybersecurity best practices and adhering to physical protection guidelines, you significantly reduce the risk of breaches and data loss. With the continuous rise of cybercrimes and numerous vulnerabilities, data center security has become a necessity to ensure seamless day-to-day operations and prevent compliance issues.


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