Gerasimos

Go Software Engineer. Previously worked at netdata Inc, Landoop Ltd.

Go vs .NET Core in terms of HTTP performance

Hello Friends!

Lately I’ve heard a lot of discussion around the new .NET Core and its performance especially on web servers.

I didn’t want to start comparing two different things, so I did patience for quite long for a more stable version.

This Monday, Microsoft announced the .NET Core version 2.0, so I feel ready to do it! Do you?

As we already mentioned, we will compare two identical things here, in terms of application, the expected response and the stability of their run times, so we will not try to put more things in the game like JSON or XMLencoders and decoders, just a simple text message. To achieve a fair comparison we will use the MVC architecture pattern on both sides, Go and .NET Core.

Prerequisites

Go (or Golang): is a rapidly growing open source programming language designed for building simple, fast, and reliable software.

There are not lot of web frameworks for Go with MVC support but, luckily for us Iris does the job.

Iris: A fast, simple and efficient micro web framework for Go. It provides a beautifully expressive and easy to use foundation for your next website, API, or distributed app.

C#: is a general-purpose, object-oriented programming language. Its development team is led by Anders Hejlsberg.

.NET Core: Develop high performance applications in less time, on any platform.

Download Go from https://golang.org/dl and .NET Core from https://www.microsoft.com/net/core.

After you’ve download and install these, you will need Iris from Go’s side. Installation is very easy, just open your terminal and execute:

go get -u github.com/kataras/iris

Benchmarking

Hardware

  • Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7–4710HQ CPU @ 2.50GHz 2.50GHz
  • RAM: 8.00 GB

Software

Both of the applications will just return the text “value” on request path “api/values/{id}”.

.NET Core MVC

Logo designed by Pablo Iglesias.

Created using dotnet new webapi . That webapitemplate will generate the code for you, including the return “value” on GET method requests.

Source Code

Start the .NET Core web server

$ cd netcore-mvc
$ dotnet run -c Release
Hosting environment: Production
Content root path: C:\mygopath\src\github.com\kataras\iris\_benchmarks\netcore-mvc
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.

Target and run the HTTP benchmark tool

$ bombardier -c 125 -n 5000000 http://localhost:5000/api/values/5
Bombarding http://localhost:5000/api/values/5 with 5000000 requests using 125 connections
5000000 / 5000000 [=====================================================] 100.00% 2m3s
Done!
Statistics Avg Stdev Max
Reqs/sec 40226.03 8724.30 161919
Latency 3.09ms 1.40ms 169.12ms
HTTP codes:
1xx - 0, 2xx - 5000000, 3xx - 0, 4xx - 0, 5xx - 0
others - 0
Throughput: 8.91MB/s

Iris MVC

Logo designed by Santosh Anand.

Source Code

Start the Go web server

$ cd iris-mvc
$ go run main.go
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Application started. Press CTRL+C to shut down.

Target and run the HTTP benchmark tool

$ bombardier -c 125 -n 5000000 http://localhost:5000/api/values/5
Bombarding http://localhost:5000/api/values/5 with 5000000 requests using 125 connections
5000000 / 5000000 [======================================================] 100.00% 47s
Done!
Statistics Avg Stdev Max
Reqs/sec 105643.81 7687.79 122564
Latency 1.18ms 366.55us 22.01ms
HTTP codes:
1xx - 0, 2xx - 5000000, 3xx - 0, 4xx - 0, 5xx - 0
others - 0
Throughput: 19.65MB/s

For those who understand better by images, I did print my screen too!

Click here to see these screenshots.

Summary

  • Time to complete the 5000000 requests - smaller is better.
  • Reqs/sec — bigger is better.
  • Latency — smaller is better
  • Throughput — bigger is better.
  • Memory usage — smaller is better.
  • LOC (Lines Of Code) — smaller is better.

.NET Core MVC Application, written using 86 lines of code, ran for 2 minutes and 8 seconds serving 39311.56 requests per second within 3.19ms latency in average and 229.73ms max, the memory usage of all these was ~126MB (without the dotnet host).

Iris MVC Application, written using 27 lines of code, ran for 47 seconds serving 105643.71 requests per second within 1.18ms latency in average and 22.01ms max, the memory usage of all these was ~12MB.

There is also another benchmark with templates, scroll to the bottom.

Update 20 August 2017

As Josh Clark and Scott Hanselman‏ pointed out on this re-tweet , on .NET Core Startup.cs file the line with services.AddMvc(); can be replaced with services.AddMvcCore(); . I followed their helpful instructions and re-run the benchmarks. The article now contains the latest benchmark output for the .NET Core application with the change both Josh and Scott noted.

It had a small difference but not as huge (8.91MB/s from 8.61MB/s)

For those who want to compare with the standard services.AddMvc(); you can see the old output by pressing here.

Can you stay a bit longer for one more?

Let’s run one more benchmark, spawn 1000000 requests but this time we expect HTML generated by templates via the view engine.

.NET Core MVC with Templates

Start the .NET Core web server

$ cd netcore-mvc-templates
$ dotnet run -c Release
Hosting environment: Production
Content root path: C:\mygopath\src\github.com\kataras\iris\_benchmarks\netcore-mvc-templates
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.

Target and run the HTTP benchmark tool

Bombarding http://localhost:5000 with 1000000 requests using 125 connections
1000000 / 1000000 [====================================================] 100.00% 1m20s
Done!
Statistics Avg Stdev Max
Reqs/sec 11738.60 7741.36 125887
Latency 10.10ms 22.10ms 1.97s
HTTP codes:
1xx — 0, 2xx — 1000000, 3xx — 0, 4xx — 0, 5xx — 0
others — 0
Throughput: 89.03MB/s

Iris MVC with Templates

Start the Go web server

$ cd iris-mvc-templates
$ go run main.go
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Application started. Press CTRL+C to shut down.

Target and run the HTTP benchmark tool

Bombarding http://localhost:5000 with 1000000 requests using 125 connections
1000000 / 1000000 [======================================================] 100.00% 37s
Done!
Statistics Avg Stdev Max
Reqs/sec 26656.76 1944.73 31188
Latency 4.69ms 1.20ms 22.52ms
HTTP codes:
1xx — 0, 2xx — 1000000, 3xx — 0, 4xx — 0, 5xx — 0
others — 0
Throughput: 192.51MB/s

Summary

  • Time to complete the 1000000 requests — smaller is better.
  • Reqs/sec — bigger is better.
  • Latency — smaller is better
  • Memory usage — smaller is better.
  • Throughput — bigger is better.

.NET Core MVC with Templates Application ran for 1 minute and 20 seconds serving 11738.60 requests per second with 89.03MB/s within 10.10ms latency in average and 1.97s max, the memory usage of all these was ~193MB (without the dotnet host).

Iris MVC with Templates Application ran for 37 seconds serving 26656.76 requests per second with 192.51MB/s within 1.18ms latency in average and 22.52ms max, the memory usage of all these was ~17MB.

What next?

Download the example source code from there and run the same benchmarks from your machine, then come back here and share your results with the rest of us!

For those who want to add other go or c# .net core web frameworks to the list please push a PR to the _benchmarks folder inside this repository.

I need to personally thanks the dev.to team for sharing my article at their twitter account, as well.

Thank you all for the 100% green feedback, have fun!

Update: Monday, 21 August 2017

A lot of people reached me saying that want to see a new benchmarking article based on the .NET Core’s lower level Kestrel this time.

So I did, follow the below link to learn the performance difference between Kestrel and Iris, it contains a sessions storage management benchmark too!

I like the visual effects when I click the clap button more than once, do you? It’s simple: just click the clap button. If you feel strongly, click it more (or just hold it down).

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