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NOIR: Neural Signal Operated Intelligent Robots for Everyday Activities: Appendix 3by@escholar

NOIR: Neural Signal Operated Intelligent Robots for Everyday Activities: Appendix 3

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Too Long; Didn't Read

NOIR presents a groundbreaking BRI system enabling humans to control robots for real-world activities, but also raises concerns about decoding speed limitations and ethical risks. While challenges remain in skill library development, NOIR's potential in assistive technology and collaborative interaction signifies a significant step forward in human-robot collaboration.
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Authors:

(1) Ruohan Zhang, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI), Stanford University & Equally contributed; [email protected];

(2) Sharon Lee, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University & Equally contributed; [email protected];

(3) Minjune Hwang, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University & Equally contributed; [email protected];

(4) Ayano Hiranaka, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University & Equally contributed; [email protected];

(5) Chen Wang, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University;

(6) Wensi Ai, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University;

(7) Jin Jie Ryan Tan, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University;

(8) Shreya Gupta, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University;

(9) Yilun Hao, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University;

(10) Ruohan Gao, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University;

(11) Anthony Norcia, Department of Psychology, Stanford University

(12) Li Fei-Fei, 1Department of Computer Science, Stanford University & Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI), Stanford University;

(13) Jiajun Wu, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University & Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI), Stanford University.

Abstract & Introduction

Brain-Robot Interface (BRI): Background

The NOIR System

Experiments

Results

Conclusion, Limitations, and Ethical Concerns

Acknowledgments & References

Appendix 1: Questions and Answers about NOIR

Appendix 2: Comparison between Different Brain Recording Devices

Appendix 3: System Setup

Appendix 4: Task Definitions

Appendix 5: Experimental Procedure

Appendix 6: Decoding Algorithms Details

Appendix 7: Robot Learning Algorithm Details

Appendix 3: System Setup

Robot platform. The robot we use in our tabletop manipulation task is a standard Franka Emika robot arm with three RealSense cameras. For mobile manipulation, we use a Tiago++ model from PAL Robotics, with an omnidirectional base, two 7-degrees-of-freedom arms with parallel-yaw grippers, a 1-degree-of-freedom prismatic torso, two SICK LiDAR sensors (back and front of the base), and an ASUS Xtion RGB-D camera mounted on the robot’s head, which can be controlled in yaw and pitch. All sensors and actuators are connected through the Robot Operating System, ROS [74]. The code runs on a laptop with an Nvidia GTX 1070 that sends the commands to the onboard robot computer to be executed.



Primitive skills list. A list of primitive skills along with their parameters can be found in Table 6, eight for Franka (16 tasks) and five for Tiago (four tasks). Human users can accomplish all 20 tasks, which are long-horizon and challenging, using these skills.


This paper is available on arxiv under CC 4.0 license.