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High-Resolution Transmission Spectroscopy of the Terrestrial Exoplanet GJ 486b: Observationby@exoplanetology

High-Resolution Transmission Spectroscopy of the Terrestrial Exoplanet GJ 486b: Observation

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The exoplanet GJ 486b, orbiting an M3.5 star, is expected to have one of the strongest transmission spectroscopy signals among known terrestrial exoplanets.
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This paper is available on arxiv under CC 4.0 license.

Authors:

(1) Andrew Ridden-Harper, Department of Astronomy and Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University & Las Cumbres Observatory;

(2) Stevanus K. Nugroho, Astrobiology Center & Japan & National Astronomical Observatory of Japan;

(3) Laura Flagg, Department of Astronomy and Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University;

(4) Ray Jayawardhana, Department of Astronomy, Cornell University;

(5) Jake D. Turner, Department of Astronomy and Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University & NHFP Sagan Fellow;

(6) Ernst de Mooij, Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics & Queen’s University Belfast;

(7) Ryan MacDonald, Department of Astronomy and Carl Sagan Institute;

(8) Emily Deibert, David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto & Gemini Observatory, NSF’s NOIRLab;

(9) Motohide Tamura, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto

(10) Takayuki Kotani, Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Astrobiology Center & National Astronomical Observatory of Japan;

(11) Teruyuki Hirano, Astrobiology Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan & Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies;

(12) Masayuki Kuzuhara, Las Cumbres Observatory & Astrobiology Center;

(13) Masashi Omiya, Las Cumbres Observatory & Astrobiology Center;

(14) Nobuhiko Kusakabe, Las Cumbres Observatory & Astrobiology Center.

2. OBSERVATIONS

We used three different instruments to observe three separate transit events of GJ 486b. The first transit was observed with the Infrared Doppler (IRD) instrument on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope, providing a wavelength coverage of 0.97-1.75 µm at a resolving power of R = 70k (Tamura et al. 2012; Kotani et al. 2018). The second transit was observed with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 8.1 m GeminiSouth telescope (program ID: GS-2021A-DD-105), providing a wavelength coverage of 1.45-2.45 µm at a resolving power of R = 45k (Park et al. 2014; Lee & Gullikson 2016; Mace et al. 2018). The third transit was observed with the SPectropolarim`etre InfraROUge (SPIRou) on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawai’i Telescope (CFHT) in queue mode (run ID: 21BC34), providing a wavelength coverage of 0.98-2.35 µm at a resolving power of R = 75k (Artigau et al. 2014). The observation start time, duration, integration time, cadence, total number of frames, number of frames in transit, number of frames out of transit, and average signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio per pixel for these observations are shown in Table 1.