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Are You Where You Say You Are? - User Verification Based on Typing Patternsby@Revlang
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Are You Where You Say You Are? - User Verification Based on Typing Patterns

by RevlangNovember 21st, 2020
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Are You Where You Say You Are? - User Verification Based on Typing Patterns based on typing patterns. The Revlang.com is the latest episode of a series of articles from the Revlang Revlang blog. Are you where you say you are? Please email us at: www.revellangcom.com/Revellang. Back to the page you came from: Revlang, Revlang is the official blog of Revlang and Revlang's weekly weekly blog. Please submit your comments to the weekly blog of weekly blog posts.
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Join us down the rabbit hole to a place of suspense, of dastardly motives, of spies perhaps, and of lobbing off of thumbs, or gauging out of eyes.

Imagine you are either a government agency that requires absolute security of their defensive and other systems or a corporation that would not look favorably on their latest research being purloined by third parties.

I'm talking about them keeping tabs and making certain that employee A is in actuality where his or her password, fingerprint, or eye-scan says he or she is located and working on station Z.

Passwords are sometimes comprised of birthdays or names of loved ones, and they get written down on pieces of paper that may fall in the hands of cads bent on mischief, or wily hackers may lift them from their hiding places. Fingerprints can be copied or fingers removed and other body parts as well.

Now, I shall take us back to the period of World War 2 or of the cold war, where morse operators could easily identify their counterparts by their 'hand', or by the frequency and manner of hitting the key. If we now transpose this hack to the present where most of us use a keyboard in our workplace, whether for coding or for the writing of prose.

Is it not conceivable that an Artificial Intelligence program could track the typing of all the employees and identify their specific 'hand' for security purposes?

Maybe coupled with the geolocation of their mobile phone? And from there compare the 'hand' with the password of the operator and see if they are one and the same?

I do hope I'm not too late and this is already being done routinely every where, as has been the case on numerous occasions!?

Or if it is not, then is it not about time someone saw to it? ;-)