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Hackernoon logoA Quick Coding Lesson On Go's ‘WaitGroup’ (vs. JavaScript's ‘PromiseAll’) by@wagslane

A Quick Coding Lesson On Go's ‘WaitGroup’ (vs. JavaScript's ‘PromiseAll’)

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@wagslaneLane Wagner

Bitcoinist, libertarian, atheist, cryptography fan, and founder of http://qvault.io

In applications that are i/o heavy, it can get clunky to synchronously execute high-latency functions one after the other.

For example, if I have a web page that needs to request 7 files from the server before it can show the page, I need to asynchronously fetch all those files at the same time. The alternative will take much too long. This is where PromiseAll and WaitGroup come in.

Let's take a look at an example of synchronous* JavaScript code:

const fetch = require('node-fetch')

async function runSync() {
    const resp = await fetch('https://qvault.io')
    let text = await resp.text()
    console.log(text)
    const resp2 = await fetch('https://github.com')
    text = await resp2.text()
    console.log(text)
    const resp3 = await fetch('https://gitlab.io')
    text = await resp3.text()
    console.log(text)
}

runSync()

*Note: Due to some technicalities with JavaScript, the above utilizes asynchronous code (see async/await), but for the purposes of our discussion, each fetch() is synchronous in relation to each other.

On order to speed this up, we want each network call to the server (the fetch() calls) to happen at the same time. Take a look:

const fetch = require('node-fetch')

async function runAsync() {
    const promise1 = fetch('https://qvault.io')
    const promise2 = fetch('https://github.com')
    const promise3 = fetch('https://gitlab.io')

    await Promise.all([promise1, promise2, promise3]).then(async (values) => {
        let text = await values[0].text()
        console.log(text)
        text = await values[1].text()
        console.log(text)
        text = await values[2].text()
        console.log(text)
    });
}

runAsync()

WaitGroup

In Go, we have a similar concept, the standard sync package's WaitGroup type. First however, let's take a look at how to synchronously fetch data over the wire:

const fetch = require('node-fetch')

async function runAsync() {
    const promise1 = fetch('https://qvault.io')
    const promise2 = fetch('https://github.com')
    const promise3 = fetch('https://gitlab.io')

    await Promise.all([promise1, promise2, promise3]).then(async (values) => {
        let text = await values[0].text()
        console.log(text)
        text = await values[1].text()
        console.log(text)
        text = await values[2].text()
        console.log(text)
    });
}

runAsync()

As before, the problem here is that each network call is done in succession, wasting time. Let's use some goroutines, which we start by using the go keyword:

package main

import (
	"bytes"
	"fmt"
	"net/http"
)

func main() {
	go getAndPrintData("https://qvault.io")
	go getAndPrintData("https://github.com")
	go getAndPrintData("https://gitlab.io")
}

func getAndPrintData(url string) {
	resp, _ := http.Get(url)
	buf := new(bytes.Buffer)
	buf.ReadFrom(resp.Body)
	fmt.Println(buf.String())
}

If you ran this code, you will see that nothing is printed and the program exits almost immediately. the problem is that after starting 3 separate goroutines and yielding execution back to the main thread, there is nothing stopping main() from exiting. Once main exits, it cleans up its goroutines before they can get a response.

In order to make sure that we wait for all of our functions to complete, but to still allow them to execute at the same time, we use a WaitGroup.

package main

import (
	"bytes"
	"fmt"
	"net/http"
	"sync"
)

func main() {
	wg := sync.WaitGroup{}
	wg.Add(3)

	go func() {
		defer wg.Done()
		getAndPrintData("https://qvault.io")
	}()
	go func() {
		defer wg.Done()
		getAndPrintData("https://github.com")
	}()
	go func() {
		defer wg.Done()
		getAndPrintData("https://gitlab.io")
	}()
	wg.Wait()
}

func getAndPrintData(url string) {
	resp, _ := http.Get(url)
	buf := new(bytes.Buffer)
	buf.ReadFrom(resp.Body)
	fmt.Println(buf.String())
}

First, we create a WaitGroup, in our case, wg. Then we use the Add() function to let the WaitGroup know there are 3 counters to wait for. We pass a pointer to the WaitGroup to each goroutine and use the defer keyword to mark a counter done when each goroutine exits.

In the main thread we use the Wait() function to block the main thread until all of the goroutines have exited.

WaitGroups in Go are very similar to PromiseAll in JavaScript and can be a useful tool when developing web client applications.

Thanks For Reading

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