paint-brush
3 in 5 College Students in America Don't Have Their Basic Needs Metby@brianwallace
191 reads

3 in 5 College Students in America Don't Have Their Basic Needs Met

by Brian Wallace2mApril 3rd, 2023
Read on Terminal Reader
Read this story w/o Javascript
tldt arrow

Too Long; Didn't Read

Supporting student basic needs is the easiest and most effective way to ensure student success. Nearly 3 in 5 college students experienced basic needs insecurity in 2020. Students of color are more likely to experience basic needs challenges, and overall, more students now than ever before are struggling to make ends meet while receiving an education.
featured image - 3 in 5 College Students in America Don't Have Their Basic Needs Met
Brian Wallace HackerNoon profile picture

Supporting student basic needs is the easiest and most effective way to ensure student success. More than half of all college students currently struggle to have their basic needs met, forcing them to choose between their education and their livelihood. Nearly 3 in 5 college students experienced basic needs insecurity in 2020, a national wellness survey found.

Basic needs insecurity is defined as lacking access to stable sources of food, shelter, and other living essentials. Students of color are more likely to experience basic needs challenges, and overall, more students now than ever before are struggling to make ends meet while receiving an education. This insecurity jeopardizes student success, and often leads to a lower overall graduation rate.

The research even shows that low income individuals are five times more likely to move out of poverty if they attain a college degree.

Helping students meet their basic needs, or failing to do so, is an equity issue that must be addressed across the United States.

College students are struggling for a number of reasons, and even though many grants are available, there are still challenges that remain for those seeking aid. Students with low income are more often now opting out of college, as states like Kentucky have seen enrollment declines for nearly a decade. Some barriers that are making getting help difficult are that many don't believe they are eligible for aid, many think that others are in greater need than themselves, and most don’t know how to apply for campus support. 

Despite these barriers, students who have applied for these aids and grants have found success in doing so. In fact, of students who received emergency aid, almost 70% said that the funding increased their chances of graduating. The bottom line is that supporting student needs leads to success, and helping students starts with the basics. Promising resources to those in need, and increasing access and awareness to those who may need it are the first steps.

The future is bright for so many students across the country, and it is imperative that their institutions guide them to that success.