The Private Life of Galileoby@robertsball

The Private Life of Galileo

tldt arrow
Read on Terminal Reader
Read this story w/o Javascript

Too Long; Didn't Read

Among the ranks of the great astronomers it would be difficult to find one whose life presents more interesting features and remarkable vicissitudes than does that of Galileo. We may consider him as the patient investigator and brilliant discoverer. We may consider him in his private relations, especially to his daughter, Sister Maria Celeste, a woman of very remarkable character; and we have also the pathetic drama at the close of Galileo's life, when the philosopher drew down upon himself the thunders of the Inquisition. The materials for the sketch of this astonishing man are sufficiently abundant. We make special use in this place of those charming letters which his daughter wrote to him from her convent home. More than a hundred of these have been preserved, and it may well be doubted whether any more beautiful and touching series of letters addressed to a parent by a dearly loved child have ever been written. An admirable account of this correspondence is contained in a little book entitled "The Private Life of Galileo," published anonymously by Messrs. Macmillan in 1870, and I have been much indebted to the author of that volume for many of the facts contained in this chapter.
featured image - The Private Life of Galileo
Robert S. Ball HackerNoon profile picture

@robertsball

Robert S. Ball

I was an Irish astronomer who founded the screw theory.


Receive Stories from @robertsball

react to story with heart

RELATED STORIES

L O A D I N G
. . . comments & more!