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RAILWAY SIGNALLING.by@archibaldwilliams

RAILWAY SIGNALLING.

by Archibald Williams 20mOctober 28th, 2023
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The block system—Position of signals—Interlocking the signals—Locking gear—Points—Points and signals in combination—Working the block system—Series of signalling operations—Single line signals—The train staff—Train staff and ticket—Electric train staff system—Interlocking—Signalling operations—Power signalling—Pneumatic signalling—Automatic signalling. UNDER certain conditions—namely, at sharp curves or in darkness—the most powerful brakes might not avail to prevent a train running into the rear of another, if trains were allowed to follow each other closely over the line. It is therefore necessary to introduce an effective system of keeping trains running in the same direction a sufficient distance apart, and this is done by giving visible and easily understood orders to the driver while a train is in motion. In the early days of the railway it was customary to allow a time interval between the passings of trains, a train not being permitted to leave a station until at least five minutes after the start of a preceding train. This method did not, of course, prevent collisions, as the first train sometimes broke down soon after leaving the station; and in the absence of effective brakes, its successor ran into it. The advent of the electric telegraph, which put stations in rapid communication with one another, proved of the utmost value to the safe working of railways. THE BLOCK SYSTEM. Time limits were abolished and distance limits substituted. A line was divided into blocks, or lengths, and two trains going in the same direction were never allowed on any one block at the same time. The signal-posts carrying the movable arms, or semaphores, by means of which the signalman communicates with the engine-driver, are well known to us. They are usually placed on the left-hand side of the line of rails to which they apply, with their arms pointing away from the rails. The side of the arms which faces the direction from which a train approaches has a white stripe painted on a red background, the other side has a black stripe on a white background.
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Archibald Williams

Archibald Williams

@archibaldwilliams

Archibald Williams was a prolific British author and journalist who lived from 1871 to 1934.

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Archibald Williams @archibaldwilliams
Archibald Williams was a prolific British author and journalist who lived from 1871 to 1934.

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