Moving Beyond the Physical Data Centers: Decentralized Internet Interview by@tigerchops

Moving Beyond the Physical Data Centers: Decentralized Internet Interview

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Tigerchops

Bought some NFTs, The SandBox 1 week Challenge runner up. y.at/🐜🍯🕸📟

In decentralization, we trust, and in our community, we believe!

This interview is part of the #Decentralized-Internet writing contest! For those reading about it for the first time, HackerNoon has built a partnership with Everscale (Formerly Free Ton) - a decentralized, community-powered blockchain movement for free internet! This is the last month to participate in the contest. You can see all #Decentralized-Internet stories here.

So, without further ado, let’s start the interview.

#Thank you for joining us! Please tell us about yourself.

Well, my day job is that of a Cloud solutions Architect, which in itself is a start to decentralization moving beyond the physical data centers, albeit within an organization. My extra-curricular interests have revolved around blockchain and metaverse tech for a while now.

I also own a few parcels of Land in the Sandbox, and I spend time in Decentraland and Somnium space at various events. Also, I am working on creating experiences on my Lands and helping out projects with their metaverse journey.

#Let's discuss centralized internet first. What is your opinion on the centralized internet? What are its pros/cons?

The pro - In one word, governance. Whilst it may be hard to argue against decentralization where there is no place for government regulation, there is no denying this could potentially be a problem. One example is extremist groups can utilize decentralized communication, and with no central entity in control of the mechanism used to disseminate their information, how can we shut it down. The same also can go for cyberbullying.

The cons, governance, some governments’ definitions of what they could consider extremist groups could be stretched out to include anyone from protesters to a book reading group. The centralized internet also allows organizations too much control of personal data.

#What does decentralization mean to you?

Decentralization will take our personal data out of the hands of organizations. We will no longer need to store our personal data with the likes of Facebook and Google, who make their money by monetizing that data. The individual will be in control of their own data.

#How decentralization changes the internet?

As I’ve stated in our internet activities are under constant surveillance, our user data is regularly tracked and collected by corporations, by application developers, and by governments. In a decentralized peer-to-peer blockchain alternative, the community will own and operate the infrastructure, taking control from governments and corporations.

#What is the best thing about decentralized internet?

A decentralized internet based on blockchain will ensure data security. It makes the internet a public resource. Existing Internet platforms, user data, and applications are typically hosted on central servers, allowing companies to create detailed profiles of their users. This data has been used to manipulate populations and election results; we only need to look at Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Blockchain technology on a decentralized internet will mean your profile data is yours to keep or share when you decide to. All you will need to access applications is your Blockchain wallet. You won’t need hundreds of login names and passwords to remember. A hacker will gain nothing from hacking an application to learn usernames and passwords because there are none.

#What are the biggest challenges in the way of the decentralized web?

The unbridled freedom that comes with decentralization means that without the rules and regulations of a centralized platform, people can take advantage of this freedom to spread hateful views and misinformation without fear of being banned.

The answer to this challenge can be decentralization in itself. The blockchain is inherently transparent, and this kind of false info could be filtered at a user level. However, this does put the reliance on the user to do their due diligence. This can only be a good thing and again puts the power in the hands of the user.

#Do you have any apprehension or fear related to the decentralization of the internet?

As mentioned in my last answer, the freedom decentralization brings with it and the advantage this will give those who wish to perform harm. The majority of communities will undoubtedly self-regulate appropriately; however their always exceptions.

#How do you see the future of the decentralized internet?

A Decentralized internet is going to change a lot of things, it’s going to have a bit impact on the current major centralized internet organizations. They will no longer be in control of the user will. It’s going to become much more integrated into everyday life, and you will have control.

You’ll no longer be subject to what Google or Facebook want you to see. You’ll make these decisions you’ll decide what info to share.

#Thank you for your time! Any closing thoughts/advice for the readers?

The truth is a truly decentralized internet could well be a long way off. It will rely on the interoperability of a lot of permissionless platforms. I think Meta has the user numbers to rule at the moment and will be around for quite a while.

However, as your average, non-technical user gets used to this on Meta platform, which I have no doubt will be permission-based (read my article About-my-ambivalence-towards-a-centralized-metaverse to understand why). This will change, and users will migrate to decentralized apps eventually.


Everscale

In decentralization, we trust, and in our community, we believe!

This interview is part of the #Decentralized-Internet writing contest! For those reading about it for the first time, HackerNoon has built a partnership with Everscale (Formerly Free Ton) - a decentralized, community-powered blockchain movement for free internet! This is the last month to participate in the contest. You can see all #Decentralized-Internet stories here.

So, without further ado, let’s start the interview.

#Thank you for joining us! Please tell us about yourself.

Well, my day job is that of a Cloud solutions Architect, which in itself is a start to decentralization moving beyond the physical data centers, albeit within an organization. My extra-curricular interests have revolved around blockchain and metaverse tech for a while now.

I also own a few parcels of Land in the Sandbox, and I spend time in Decentraland and Somnium space at various events. Also, I am working on creating experiences on my Lands and helping out projects with their metaverse journey.

#Let's discuss centralized internet first. What is your opinion on the centralized internet? What are its pros/cons?

The pro - In one word, governance. Whilst it may be hard to argue against decentralization where there is no place for government regulation, there is no denying this could potentially be a problem. One example is extremist groups can utilize decentralized communication, and with no central entity in control of the mechanism used to disseminate their information, how can we shut it down. The same also can go for cyberbullying.

The cons, governance, some governments’ definitions of what they could consider extremist groups could be stretched out to include anyone from protesters to a book reading group. The centralized internet also allows organizations too much control of personal data.

#What does decentralization mean to you?

Decentralization will take our personal data out of the hands of organizations. We will no longer need to store our personal data with the likes of Facebook and Google, who make their money by monetizing that data. The individual will be in control of their own data.

#How decentralization changes the internet?

As I’ve stated in our internet activities are under constant surveillance, our user data is regularly tracked and collected by corporations, by application developers, and by governments. In a decentralized peer-to-peer blockchain alternative, the community will own and operate the infrastructure, taking control from governments and corporations.

#What is the best thing about decentralized internet?

A decentralized internet based on blockchain will ensure data security. It makes the internet a public resource. Existing Internet platforms, user data, and applications are typically hosted on central servers, allowing companies to create detailed profiles of their users. This data has been used to manipulate populations and election results; we only need to look at Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Blockchain technology on a decentralized internet will mean your profile data is yours to keep or share when you decide to. All you will need to access applications is your Blockchain wallet. You won’t need hundreds of login names and passwords to remember. A hacker will gain nothing from hacking an application to learn usernames and passwords because there are none.

#What are the biggest challenges in the way of the decentralized web?

The unbridled freedom that comes with decentralization means that without the rules and regulations of a centralized platform, people can take advantage of this freedom to spread hateful views and misinformation without fear of being banned.

The answer to this challenge can be decentralization in itself. The blockchain is inherently transparent, and this kind of false info could be filtered at a user level. However, this does put the reliance on the user to do their due diligence. This can only be a good thing and again puts the power in the hands of the user.

#Do you have any apprehension or fear related to the decentralization of the internet?

As mentioned in my last answer, the freedom decentralization brings with it and the advantage this will give those who wish to perform harm. The majority of communities will undoubtedly self-regulate appropriately; however their always exceptions.

#How do you see the future of the decentralized internet?

A Decentralized internet is going to change a lot of things, it’s going to have a bit impact on the current major centralized internet organizations. They will no longer be in control of the user will. It’s going to become much more integrated into everyday life, and you will have control.

You’ll no longer be subject to what Google or Facebook want you to see. You’ll make these decisions you’ll decide what info to share.

#Thank you for your time! Any closing thoughts/advice for the readers?

The truth is a truly decentralized internet could well be a long way off. It will rely on the interoperability of a lot of permissionless platforms. I think Meta has the user numbers to rule at the moment and will be around for quite a while.

However, as your average, non-technical user gets used to this on Meta platform, which I have no doubt will be permission-based (read my article About-my-ambivalence-towards-a-centralized-metaverse to understand why). This will change, and users will migrate to decentralized apps eventually.

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