IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT’S NOSE BECOMES OUTRAGEOUSLY LONGby@julesverne

IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT’S NOSE BECOMES OUTRAGEOUSLY LONG

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The next morning poor, jaded, famished Passepartout said to himself that he must get something to eat at all hazards, and the sooner he did so the better. He might, indeed, sell his watch; but he would have starved first. Now or never he must use the strong, if not melodious voice which nature had bestowed upon him. He knew several French and English songs, and resolved to try them upon the Japanese, who must be lovers of music, since they were for ever pounding on their cymbals, tam-tams, and tambourines, and could not but appreciate European talent.
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@julesverne

Jules Verne

French novelist, poet and playwright.


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