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Doe Defendants in Elon Musk's X Lawsuit Against the Center for Countering Digital Hateby@legalpdf
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Doe Defendants in Elon Musk's X Lawsuit Against the Center for Countering Digital Hate

by Legal PDFMarch 31st, 2024
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CCDH argues that X Corp.'s claims against Doe defendants lack plausibility due to vague and conclusory allegations. X Corp. faces challenges in establishing a clear basis for holding these defendants liable in its lawsuit.
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X Corp. v. Center for Countering Digital Hate, INC. Court Filing, retrieved on March 25, 2024 is part of HackerNoon’s Legal PDF Series. You can jump to any part in this filing here. This part is 18 of 19.

E. Doe Defendants

CCDH’s last argument is that X Corp. fails to state a claim against the Doe defendants. MTD&S at 26. X Corp. alleges that “one [unnamed] United States senator referred to CCDH as ‘[a] foreign dark money group,’” and that “[o]ther articles have claimed that CCDH is, in part, funded and supported by foreign organizations and entities whose directors, trustees, and other decision-makers are affiliated with legacy media organizations.” FAC ¶ 62. It further alleges that “CCDH is acting . . . at the behest of and in concert with funders, supporters, and other entities.” Id. ¶ 63. These allegations are vague and conclusory, and do not state a plausible claim against the Doe defendants. See Iqbal, 556 U.S. at 678 (claim is plausible “when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged.”).



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This court case retrieved on March 25, 2024, from storage.courtlistener is part of the public domain. The court-created documents are works of the federal government, and under copyright law, are automatically placed in the public domain and may be shared without legal restriction.