Debunking the Myths Around No-Code Technology by@shriramkrishnan

Debunking the Myths Around No-Code Technology

No-code tools have become a key enabler of the digital transformation age. In its latest incarnation, no-code has moved beyond development to impact a number of other specialties, from AI to DevOps to security. Let’s look at five big misconceptions about no-codes platforms. The same technology that makes it easy for non-technical staff to build and deploy apps and test plans can also simplify the work of your tech experts. No code is better than coded but for complex processes, tech teams can write custom code that meshes seamlessly with pre-produced material.
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Shriram Krishnan

Vice President - Australia & New Zealand at ACCELQ


No-code tools have become a key enabler of the digital transformation age, allowing people without specialized skills to create apps and websites. In its latest incarnation, no-code has moved beyond development to impact a number of other specialties, from AI to DevOps to security.


In the test automation space, no-code is proving to be a tremendous boost to ensuring that the entire spectrum of a company’s properties — web, mobile, apps, APIs, etc. — are error-free and work together seamlessly. But no-code technology isn’t a magic bullet. There’s still plenty of knowledge and effort that goes into making no-code tools work correctly. Let’s look at five big misconceptions about no-code platforms.


Myth #1: No-code means no coding

Despite the name, no-code tools do not completely avoid coding. Nor should they. Not all project requirements — whether that’s development or testing or any other area — can be addressed with a pre-packaged solution.


Ideally, there’s a level of flexibility built into the tools, enough so that they replace a lot of the repetitive work involved in creating applications while ensuring that the user doesn’t get bogged down with complexity in each line of syntax. A good ratio is about 90% out-of-the-box functionality to 10% customization.


Myth #2: No-code tools will replace developers and testers

On the contrary, no-code tools can actually make things easier on developers and tech teams. The same technology that makes it easy for non-technical staff to build and deploy apps and test plans can also simplify the work of your tech experts.


No-code technology can be used for a majority of use cases, especially the simpler ones, but for complex processes, tech teams can write custom code that meshes seamlessly with the pre-produced material. That hybrid approach can speed up the development and testing processes by eliminating programming complexity and enhancing the productivity of the test engineers.


Myth #3: No code is better than coded

There’s not a clear winner in the no-code vs. full-code battle because it all depends on the context. For simple apps and solutions, or for testing scenarios that only go down the “happy path,” no-code generally works great. And they’re terrific tools for non-technical types who have deep knowledge in a particular area and get to use no code to build their own automation tools.


In the QA testing arena, automation engineers will be in high demand because of their ability not only to write code but to bring specific skills and training to that aspect of the process.


Myth #4: No-code isn’t for everyone

No matter the level of complexity of a particular business, there will always be those mundane tasks that have to be done behind the scenes. In that sense, no-code automation works for everyone. Those tools have been shown to increase productivity and reduce development and maintenance time, so they bring a definitive ROI.


The best no-code tools are developed with a design-first approach, with modularity and reusability built in as key components. Everyone benefits from a good design practice, which is essential to sustain automation regardless of the industry.


Myth #5: No-code will solve everything

As helpful as no-code tools are, they aren’t infallible. Their shortcomings stem primarily from what they don’t know or haven’t encountered before. Complicated elements will still need personal attention, as would processes that need troubleshooting and consistent maintenance.

Even with all the myths, however, there’s still good reason to be bullish for our no-code technology future. A scenario where smart people work together with skillfully automated processes will lead to greater efficiency, reduced effort, and a better long-term solution.

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