Why the Hybrid Workplace May be the Future of Work [Infographic] by@brianwallace

Why the Hybrid Workplace May be the Future of Work [Infographic]

97% of U.S. workers now prefer working from home. For each employee a company has working 2 or 3 days a week, they save $11,000. Only 37% of all US jobs can be done entirely from home. Companies small and large should develop a hybrid workplace. The important thing in choosing a hybrid model is to listen to both the needs of management and employees. An open dialogue in which parties are honest about their expectations is necessary if companies are to produce an ideal working environment.
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Brian Wallace

Founder @ NowSourcing. Contributor @ Hackernoon, Advisor @GoogleSmallBiz, Podcaster, infographics

When COVID-19 hit American shores, 95% of office workers learned what it was like to work from home.  Despite initial skepticism, remote work has been a hit among workers.  97% now say they prefer working remotely.  Their reasons range from avoiding commutes, improving their work-life balance, and enjoying increased time with their family.  Some workers say they would even accept a pay cut if it meant they could continue to have a flexible work schedule.

Remote work has been a boon for businesses as well.  For each employee a company has working from home 2 or 3 days a week, they save $11,000.  These cost savings come from lower office costs, reduced employee absence and turnover, and increased productivity.  “Trusting in and empowering your employees to work in a responsible and professional way, while allowing them the freedom and flexibility to handle all the big and little things that life throws at us, creates a high level of morale, pride, and loyalty,” says Carol Cochran of Flexjobs.

Still, only 37% of all US jobs can be done entirely from home.  Some jobs have aspects that need an office setting to be performed well.  To achieve the best of both worlds, companies small and large should develop a hybrid workplace.  There are several models they can follow; some businesses only expect leadership to work in an office, while others want everyone to see remote work as a last option.  An in-between option allowing employees to work in the office a few times a week is also possible.  These office times could be scheduled or left up to employees and their teams to figure out.  The important thing in choosing a hybrid model is to listen to both the needs of management and employees.  

An open dialogue in which parties are honest about their expectations is necessary if companies are to produce an ideal working environment.  They should think not only about what is possible but also what is desirable.  Collaboration and inclusion must still be able to flourish in remote and hybrid environments for companies to achieve or maintain success.

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