Web 3.0: When in Doubt, Do the Opposite by@wasyne

Web 3.0: When in Doubt, Do the Opposite

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Simon W. Parker HackerNoon profile picture

Simon W. Parker

World wide banned account holder.

If you throw vacant rooms in your house to the cloud server, it’s called Airbnb. If you transmit the kitchen of your house, it’s called Uber Eats. The form of the product doesn’t matter. In return for such freedom, a sign of fragility on web 2.0 is erupting everywhere, especially in terms of privacy. Some say that web 3.0 would solve this problem but no one knows what it is now. So, remember how web 2.0 was born.

What have “web 2.0 wizards” done?

Web 2.0, as it is often called, is a generic term for services in which the customer becomes their product. The wizards said,

We are sorry for committing a crime: selling off your personal information.

When people heard it, they assumed, with horror, that the information they had was valuable.

image


Here is the “paradoxical propaganda” of web 2.0. The wizards looked back and also said,

The business of selling rotten tomatoes by mislabeling them as ‘new watermelons’ is built on the fact that all rotten tomatoes have no value.

The cost of owning the data is more than the value of the data itself. Did you know that most videos uploaded to YouTube are never played by any viewer? And they don’t even get ads. Advertising is essentially finance. They pay advertising fees from the sales of the product itself, which has not been sold yet.

The paradox is the key to incrementing our web forward. So, “When in doubt, do the opposite” is always true.

image


Lesson 1: Twitter for Reviving Humanity

When in doubt

You, a prominent entrepreneur, have been struggling with being stalked by other people. Someone is tracking you based on the contents of your own social networking, you guess. The main reason is that this app sells personal data to third parties.

You finally bought out this app company and directed it to make significant changes.

image

Re-launch to 3.0

The 3.0 version has been completed. This app has two tabs: for buyer and seller, These new features enable anyone to sell their personal information to a third party.

This app builds with so-called P2P system, which is not a centralized structure, allowing one-on-one interaction between seller and buyer. You have several phones and multiple accounts. With some phones, you put bits and pieces of information into multiple apps on the seller tab. Then, you would randomly find fragments of your personal activity on the other phones.

Next, let’s open the buyer tab. There, you will set yourself up as the targeted person. Your nickname, various labels for slander, and behavior patterns are listed. Most of the information is useless to others. You try to purchase some information from the buyer tab. The seller tab will receive the payment in your own wallet on one or another phone.

image

Do the opposite

You notice something strange about the app.

In web 2.0, the seller would normally provide the data and, in exchange, receive coins from the buyer. But surprisingly, the coins were working in the opposite way.

This is not acceptable. If they can get personal information and moreover get paid for it, wouldn’t the entire world be full of stalkers? But anyway, who care about the manufacturer of dog food for other people’s dogs?

Now, you don’t want your coins to be stolen by buyers, so you install the app on another phone of your own and collect your activities as a buyer in a rush. You’ve requested some modifications to the tech leaders on your company. They fixed it so that buyer could not do the final withdrawal of the coins without a third-party verification as a modification patch.

Be a stranger

Change the mood. Take it out as one buyer and go outside. It’s your familiar place. With your information you purchased, picture yourself as a fictitious stalker, and wander around the perimeter to surround yourself.

Now, turn to be a seller, and try to eat something with the reward you get from selling your personal information. The buyer tab immediately got some information about what you eat. This is not someone else monitoring you to get this information. You just entered it yourself.

When you look at the high reward personal activities, such knowledge is rare and confidential, since it’s only in your mind and cannot be known from other people.

Turn on the switch that synchronizes the data to the buyer tab. It’s easy to imagine how someone who doesn’t have much your information could track you. Whether it be by private jet or on foot. So you don’t have to worry about whether you are being tracked. The buyer using this app to track you is none other than you at this moment.

The only reason you should offer higher rewards to buyers is that you are a person of value. Even if buyers gain your information, they still cannot withdraw your coins as rewards. The only way to withdraw coins you got is if you as buyer can prove that you as seller are a friend who can be traced back to over 6 friends ahead.

image


This truly paradoxical application should induce the obsolescence of stalking by increasing the number of active users and lowering the action value of the onlookers themselves.

Knock off your first lesson here. So, what does this web 3.0 app enable us to do?

Lesson 2: Fighting Off In-House Mobbing

How is your job?

A company executive conducts an operation to eliminate a rebellious employee in his company. The targeted employee suspects the company’s handling of copyrights based on their products.

A centralized personnel system cannot eliminate such executive’s malice. Adopting a performance-based system will not change the situation. Rather, it’s a plot to oust competent from the company adopted achievement-oriented system. World Health Organization castigates that this kind of internal mobbing is a crime.

image

By the way, will such a scheme work in the era of web 3.0?

Regardless of their ranks in the company, the positions of an evaluator and those who are evaluated are equal because we all need to manage our own personal information.

As a result, this plot was never attempted. The mastermind left the company.

Paradoxically, this decentralized application aims to destroy the ability of the original client of this crime as central management, by offering a direct reward to the perpetrators from the targeted individual. Thus, the company’s copyright and one human life have been saved from the criminal offense.

As for copyright, it is ultimately to be cast from an individual activity. It works to protect not only the product but also all employees of the company.


Lesson 3: A Journey for Searching Empty Bottles

My Japanese friend who lives in Kobe, Japan, introduced me to the following news. (Please use Google translate!)

Over 50 years after its release, a phantom empty Coke bottle was found in Japan. A collector of retro culture had been searching for it, and after he passed away in 2019, the search team continued and they finally found it. It took 16 years.

image

It was a private copycat cola called “Kako-Cola”, which was produced and sold at a local brewery in Japan. “Kako” comes from the name of the place, which is the same sound as “Past” in Japanese.

Kako-Cola was only sold for two years in the early 1970s, and its sales had been suspended after being sued by Coca-Cola. They have a patent on the shape of the bottle rather than its contents. In fact, the sale of Kako-Cola would not have hurt Coca-Cola’s sales, but no one can blame Coca-Cola for their actions.

“You can find what you’re looking for when you stop looking for it.”

Besides not holding any copyrights, the searchers misidentified the name as “Caco-Cola”, which made the search more difficult. The Japanese words “Caco” and “Kako” are pronounced exactly the same.

But hey, why did they spend 16 years searching for an empty bottle?

Personal information is valuable only because it’s tied to the memories of the person who has the information. If the empty bottle was tied to the deceased, it has value to the bereaved family. In this context, the blockchain would act like a family tree. We should guarantee the right to trace the origin of everything.

Conclusion

Web 2.0 has only made us believe that strangers’ personal activities have value because constant and paradoxical propaganda has kept us from waking up from the brainwashing.

The Web 3.0 revolution will allow individuals to store vast amounts of data. With a lot of data to ponder, many people may be less misguided than before. But I don’t think of this innovation as brain expansion. It's a revival of the wild intelligence that humans originally possessed, prompted by an increasingly sophisticated society because humans use only part of their brain functions.

The restoration of humanity is more essential. Human beings were valuable simply for existing from time immemorial.

Web 3.0 is not enabling us to do something new, but restores us to our original state of being.


Welcome To The Web3 Writing Contest

If you throw vacant rooms in your house to the cloud server, it’s called Airbnb. If you transmit the kitchen of your house, it’s called Uber Eats. The form of the product doesn’t matter. In return for such freedom, a sign of fragility on web 2.0 is erupting everywhere, especially in terms of privacy. Some say that web 3.0 would solve this problem but no one knows what it is now. So, remember how web 2.0 was born.

What have “web 2.0 wizards” done?

Web 2.0, as it is often called, is a generic term for services in which the customer becomes their product. The wizards said,

We are sorry for committing a crime: selling off your personal information.

When people heard it, they assumed, with horror, that the information they had was valuable.

image


Here is the “paradoxical propaganda” of web 2.0. The wizards looked back and also said,

The business of selling rotten tomatoes by mislabeling them as ‘new watermelons’ is built on the fact that all rotten tomatoes have no value.

The cost of owning the data is more than the value of the data itself. Did you know that most videos uploaded to YouTube are never played by any viewer? And they don’t even get ads. Advertising is essentially finance. They pay advertising fees from the sales of the product itself, which has not been sold yet.

The paradox is the key to incrementing our web forward. So, “When in doubt, do the opposite” is always true.

image


Lesson 1: Twitter for Reviving Humanity

When in doubt

You, a prominent entrepreneur, have been struggling with being stalked by other people. Someone is tracking you based on the contents of your own social networking, you guess. The main reason is that this app sells personal data to third parties.

You finally bought out this app company and directed it to make significant changes.

image

Re-launch to 3.0

The 3.0 version has been completed. This app has two tabs: for buyer and seller, These new features enable anyone to sell their personal information to a third party.

This app builds with so-called P2P system, which is not a centralized structure, allowing one-on-one interaction between seller and buyer. You have several phones and multiple accounts. With some phones, you put bits and pieces of information into multiple apps on the seller tab. Then, you would randomly find fragments of your personal activity on the other phones.

Next, let’s open the buyer tab. There, you will set yourself up as the targeted person. Your nickname, various labels for slander, and behavior patterns are listed. Most of the information is useless to others. You try to purchase some information from the buyer tab. The seller tab will receive the payment in your own wallet on one or another phone.

image

Do the opposite

You notice something strange about the app.

In web 2.0, the seller would normally provide the data and, in exchange, receive coins from the buyer. But surprisingly, the coins were working in the opposite way.

This is not acceptable. If they can get personal information and moreover get paid for it, wouldn’t the entire world be full of stalkers? But anyway, who care about the manufacturer of dog food for other people’s dogs?

Now, you don’t want your coins to be stolen by buyers, so you install the app on another phone of your own and collect your activities as a buyer in a rush. You’ve requested some modifications to the tech leaders on your company. They fixed it so that buyer could not do the final withdrawal of the coins without a third-party verification as a modification patch.

Be a stranger

Change the mood. Take it out as one buyer and go outside. It’s your familiar place. With your information you purchased, picture yourself as a fictitious stalker, and wander around the perimeter to surround yourself.

Now, turn to be a seller, and try to eat something with the reward you get from selling your personal information. The buyer tab immediately got some information about what you eat. This is not someone else monitoring you to get this information. You just entered it yourself.

When you look at the high reward personal activities, such knowledge is rare and confidential, since it’s only in your mind and cannot be known from other people.

Turn on the switch that synchronizes the data to the buyer tab. It’s easy to imagine how someone who doesn’t have much your information could track you. Whether it be by private jet or on foot. So you don’t have to worry about whether you are being tracked. The buyer using this app to track you is none other than you at this moment.

The only reason you should offer higher rewards to buyers is that you are a person of value. Even if buyers gain your information, they still cannot withdraw your coins as rewards. The only way to withdraw coins you got is if you as buyer can prove that you as seller are a friend who can be traced back to over 6 friends ahead.

image


This truly paradoxical application should induce the obsolescence of stalking by increasing the number of active users and lowering the action value of the onlookers themselves.

Knock off your first lesson here. So, what does this web 3.0 app enable us to do?

Lesson 2: Fighting Off In-House Mobbing

How is your job?

A company executive conducts an operation to eliminate a rebellious employee in his company. The targeted employee suspects the company’s handling of copyrights based on their products.

A centralized personnel system cannot eliminate such executive’s malice. Adopting a performance-based system will not change the situation. Rather, it’s a plot to oust competent from the company adopted achievement-oriented system. World Health Organization castigates that this kind of internal mobbing is a crime.

image

By the way, will such a scheme work in the era of web 3.0?

Regardless of their ranks in the company, the positions of an evaluator and those who are evaluated are equal because we all need to manage our own personal information.

As a result, this plot was never attempted. The mastermind left the company.

Paradoxically, this decentralized application aims to destroy the ability of the original client of this crime as central management, by offering a direct reward to the perpetrators from the targeted individual. Thus, the company’s copyright and one human life have been saved from the criminal offense.

As for copyright, it is ultimately to be cast from an individual activity. It works to protect not only the product but also all employees of the company.


Lesson 3: A Journey for Searching Empty Bottles

My Japanese friend who lives in Kobe, Japan, introduced me to the following news. (Please use Google translate!)

Over 50 years after its release, a phantom empty Coke bottle was found in Japan. A collector of retro culture had been searching for it, and after he passed away in 2019, the search team continued and they finally found it. It took 16 years.

image

It was a private copycat cola called “Kako-Cola”, which was produced and sold at a local brewery in Japan. “Kako” comes from the name of the place, which is the same sound as “Past” in Japanese.

Kako-Cola was only sold for two years in the early 1970s, and its sales had been suspended after being sued by Coca-Cola. They have a patent on the shape of the bottle rather than its contents. In fact, the sale of Kako-Cola would not have hurt Coca-Cola’s sales, but no one can blame Coca-Cola for their actions.

“You can find what you’re looking for when you stop looking for it.”

Besides not holding any copyrights, the searchers misidentified the name as “Caco-Cola”, which made the search more difficult. The Japanese words “Caco” and “Kako” are pronounced exactly the same.

But hey, why did they spend 16 years searching for an empty bottle?

Personal information is valuable only because it’s tied to the memories of the person who has the information. If the empty bottle was tied to the deceased, it has value to the bereaved family. In this context, the blockchain would act like a family tree. We should guarantee the right to trace the origin of everything.

Conclusion

Web 2.0 has only made us believe that strangers’ personal activities have value because constant and paradoxical propaganda has kept us from waking up from the brainwashing.

The Web 3.0 revolution will allow individuals to store vast amounts of data. With a lot of data to ponder, many people may be less misguided than before. But I don’t think of this innovation as brain expansion. It's a revival of the wild intelligence that humans originally possessed, prompted by an increasingly sophisticated society because humans use only part of their brain functions.

The restoration of humanity is more essential. Human beings were valuable simply for existing from time immemorial.

Web 3.0 is not enabling us to do something new, but restores us to our original state of being.

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