We present herewith a series of inquiries embracing a variety of topics of greater or lessby@scientificamerican

We present herewith a series of inquiries embracing a variety of topics of greater or less

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[We present herewith a series of inquiries embracing a variety of topics of greater or less general interest. The questions are simple, it is true, but we prefer to elicit practical answers from our readers, and hope to be able to make this column of inquiries and answers a popular and useful feature of the paper.] 1.—Emery Wheels.—Can I make emery wheels similar to those used in a foot lathe, that will answer for sharpening fine tools, such as gouges, rounds, and hollows, and if so, how shall I proceed?—F. W. 2.—Boiler Furnace.—I have two boilers, twenty-four feet long and four feet in diameter each, with five ten-inch flues. The fire passes under the boiler, and enters the flues at the back end, passes through the flues, and enters the smoke stack at the front end. I use hard pine wood for fuel. Will some of your many readers give me the best way of constructing the flue under the boiler, from the end of the grate bars to where it enters the flues at the back end, and also state the proper distance from the back wall to the end of the boiler?—N. H. 3.—Medal Casts.—I have some medals which I should like to copy. Having tried several times, and failed, I thought that I would ask advice through your query columns. I do not know of what the medals are manufactured. They are, I suppose, made to imitate bronze. I have tried casting them in plaster of Paris molds, but have had very poor success, as the surface of the medals was covered with small holes. The metal used was lead and antimony, seven to one. I should like to know, if there be any metal that I can cast them of, and bring out the bronze color afterwards, or if there be any metal that I can cast them of, and afterwards color by some solution. Also, of what should I make my molds?—J. E. M.

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Oldest US science mag (est. 1845). Features contributions from Einstein, Tesla & 150+ Nobel laureates.


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