STARCHES FOR THE FINISHING OF COTTON FABRICSby@scientificamerican

STARCHES FOR THE FINISHING OF COTTON FABRICS

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The starches have been classified by Dr. Muter, according to the appearance they give under the microscope, into five groups: Class I.—Hilum and concentric rings visible. All the granules, oval or ovate. Tous-le-mois, potato, arrowroot, etc. Class II.—The concentric rings are all but invisible, the hilum is stellate. Maize, pea, bean, etc. Class III.—The concentric rings are all but invisible, also the hilum in the majority of granules. Wheat, barley, rye, chestnut, etc. Class IV.—All the granules truncated at one end. Sago, tapioca, etc. Class V.—All the granules angular in form. Rice, tacca, arrowroot, oats, etc. The principal starches used for finishing cotton fabrics are potato (farina), wheat, Indian corn (maize), rice, tapioca, arrowroot, sago; the last three not so often as those previously named.
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