Jack Pullen Shares 3 Critical Mistakes Holding You Back in Life by@angfaw9

Jack Pullen Shares 3 Critical Mistakes Holding You Back in Life

Motocross rider Jack Pullen explains why you get stuck in front of problems. Pullen: The worst way to deal with problems or situations unknown to us: your ego. The more you can read your inner self, the more courage (which is not the absence of fear, but the overcoming of fear) you have to face problems, will seem to you. Going deep means interfacing with what is uncomfortable, interacting with our shadowy areas deep inside means accepting risks and uncertainties, he says.
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Angelo Raguso

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It must have happened to you, too, to meet people who, when faced with a problem, instead of dealing with it in depth, prefer to stop at the "surface," right? Dealing with problems can be so difficult. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude toward the problem." No, it is not Jung or another luminary of psychoanalysis. It is Jack Sparrow, pirate of the Caribbean. All jokes aside, this assumption holds a valuable truth: beyond the severity of the problem, our attitude can make it worse or lighter. How to overcome life's obstacles? With open-mindedness and confidence in our own abilities (ever heard of self-empowerment?).

At first glance, Jack Pullen is a very young motocross rider. Yet, he has very clearly defined visions and goals for advancing his racing career. Not only does he understand the importance of learning from his mistakes, but he will share with us three critical mistakes that can prevent people from achieving greatness.

The worst way to deal with problems or situations unknown to us: your ego

There is a foolproof system for staying where you are without progressing: staying well entrenched in your comfort zone. In this video I explained why you get stuck in front of problems.

Very often, in the face of failure or failure, you grasp at straws and look for an external cause responsible for your holes in the water; sometimes you blame someone else.

This happens because you convince yourself that everything outside you, external reality, stimuli, everything around you is modifiable, while what is inside you (your personality, your character) is unchangeable, basically a monolith. In short, we must always identify a reason external to us that justifies our failure.

Mental closure: the second obstacle that imprisons you in your comfort zone.

Listening, dialogue, and confrontation will help you to reason and act objectively. This is important inner work: having blinders on means being convinced that you always have the solution in your pocket, without instead absorbing from others information and experiences that are useful for learning and improvement.

Jack, why do people struggle with flexibility and constructive thinking?

As my third advice, in my personal opinion, our vision is distorted: contrary to what we think, it is the external factors that are not modifiable; what is outside of us is influenceable but not directly modifiable. All our excuses, barriers, shields that we raise to protect ourselves will only make our immobility worse.

Our self-image, what we want to convey to others will confront us with great obstacles, first of all our ego: we do not want to admit our mistakes, weaknesses or insecurities, preventing us from being objective. This also happens to you. You protect your position too much. Others are fallible, but so are you.

It is difficult to dig deep within ourselves and can often even be painful. But only by really going deep can we overcome our limitations for good. Sticking to our (supposed) certainties deludes us into thinking we are sheltered from difficulties, which often leads us to settle.

This excessive need for security prevents us from living fully and achieving real satisfaction. The more superficial the response to the problem, the further away from the solution we get. The more you can read your inner self, the more courage (which is not the absence of fear, but the overcoming of fear) you have to face problems, the more solvable the problems will seem to you.

So, how can we use difficulties from a personal growth perspective?

Facing life head-on: difficult? It's a matter of mental approach, let's reiterate. There is one factor that makes a big difference: for example, the depth to which we are willing to descend. Being content to live on the surface will give us back mediocre experiences; living "comfortably," staying in the trap of excuses and victimhood, will keep us immobile.

Going around the problem without addressing it will never lead us to overcome it. Learning to live means interfacing with what is uncomfortable, interacting with our shadowy areas. Going deep inside means accepting risks and uncertainties. This is the only way to approach problems as learning opportunities.

Thanks Jack for joining us !

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