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How to import your MS SQL database to Amazon RDSby@vdoomik
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How to import your MS SQL database to Amazon RDS

by Uladzislau BaryshchykJuly 28th, 2021
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Using a cloud database will allow you to have the computing power that suits you and your cloud server will always cope with requests from users. This will expose you to the maintenance of the database, and besides that, you will not need to deal with the management of the operating system on which the database is installed. In this article, I will show you how easy it is to bring any of your MS SQL database to Amazon RDS. This article was created for training and I will use a free tier AWS account and a free database from Microsoft.

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Introduction

Nowadays, databases are used in almost all applications. They allow you to store various kinds of information. But today it is no longer necessary to have a dedicated server for databases; it is enough to have a subscription plan of a cloud provider. This will allow you to avoid such problems as when you missed the point of server maintenance and the database became unavailable.


Moreover, using a cloud database will allow you to have the computing power that suits you and your cloud server will always cope with requests from users, or you will not have excess database server capacity. In addition, this will expose you to the maintenance of the database, and besides that, you will not need to deal with the management of the operating system on which the database is installed.


Today, we have three major cloud providers: Amazon, Microsoft, Google.


In the article, I will show you how easy it is to bring any of your MS SQL database to Amazon RDS, namely, how to create a database in the cloud, connect it to MS SQL Management Studio, create S3 bucket with restoring database file, create an Option Group and attach the option group to Amazon RDS, deploy a database from a backup copy, and show you the problem when restoring from MS SQL Management Studio.


I would like to note, I note that this article was created for training and I will use a free tier AWS account and a free database from Microsoft.

Creating Amazon RDS

The first thing to do is create a database in Amazon RDS and configure it. Let's go to the RDS tab and choose to create a new MS SQL Server database. For our example, using the RDS Free Usage Tier is also fine but for real projects, if you have a large database, you need to think carefully about the correct instance size for the database (Image 1).


Image 1 - Creating a database

By click next and set the RDS parameters, namely the version of SQL Server DB instance type. In the “DB insctece identifyer” section, select a name for the database and enter a username and password (Image 2).


Image 2 - Creating Master username and Master password

Next, we will move to the “Configure advanced settings” section and be sure to check the port, namely 1433 for MS SQL and indicate the VPC, if net we will create a new one and set Public accessibility to true Image 3.


Image 3 - Configuring advanced settings

As you can see in Image 4, we have created a database.

Image 4 - Database was createdConnecting the database to MS SQL Management Studio

There are many MS SQL database management systems out there, but I will use MS SQL Management Studio. Next, let's create a connection to the database. To do this, go to MS SQL Management studio and specify the parameters for connecting to the database, namely Endpoint (example is Image 5) and the login and password specified earlier.


Image 5 Endpoint for the database

On a successful connection, you should see a list of databases from RDS. Since we do not have any database yet, we will only display “rdsadmin” database (Image 6)


Image 6 - list of database

This completes the step. Now, we move to the next step.

Creating an S3 bucket

The second is to create an S3 bucket. It must be created in the same region as Amazon RDS. This condition is required and this is indicated by the Amazon documentation. Let's upload to the .bak file. To do this, let's create an S3 bucket in the same region, and this is important, and load the .bak file into the extension. For our example, I used Microsoft Adventure works, which is fine for our example, but for a real project, you should use your database .bak file (Image 7).


Image 7 - Uploading the .bak file

This step is complete, we can move on to the next step.

Creating an Option Group

Third, we create a new option group, because by default no backups can be created in it. To do this, go to “Option Group in Amazon RDS” (Image 8) and click Create Group, since we cannot change the default group.


Image 8 - Creating an Option Group

Next, we will give a name to our group and indicate the engine and its version (Image 9)


Image 9 - Creating Option group details

Next, add a new option to the option we just created and add SQLSERVER_BACKUP_RESTORE (Image 10)


Image 10 - Adding option to Option group

Next - we connect our option group instead of the default To do this, move on in the settings of our Amazon RDS and change the Option Group in the settings (Image 11)


Image 10 - Connecting the Option Group

Next, we agree with the modification of the DB instance (Image 12)


Image 11 - Modifying DB instanceThis step is complete, we can move on to the next step.


Restoring the Database

Fifth - connect and run the database recovery script. Now we just need to run the script to restore the database. To do this, move on to MS SQL Management Studio and create a new request following code:

exec msdb.dbo.rds_restore_database @restore_db_name='CodeProjectDatabase', @s3_arn_to_restore_from='arn:aws:s3:::s3bucketrestore/AdventureWorks2016.bak'


Where:

restore_db_name is the DB name, s3bucketrestore - S3 bucket name AdventureWorks2016.bak is the name of the .bak file The result is shown in image 12.

Image 12 - Script was ran

You can check the status using the command:

exec msdb.dbo.rds_task_status


The result should be successful, then your database is exactly restored (Image 13).


Image 13 - The database was restored

Restoring the database from MS SQL Management Studio

In this step, I want to show the reason that we have chosen such a long path to restore the database. As you know, the MS SQL Management Studio uses the Restore database command, but one does not work, as shown in Image 14. If you go to the MS SQL Management Studio and choose to restore the database, you will get the same error as I did.

Image 14 - a error from MS SQL Management StudioConclusion

In the article, I showed you how easy it is to bring any of your MS SQL databases to AWS RDS, namely, how to create a database in the cloud, connect it to MS SQL Management Studio, create an S3 bucket with restoring database file, create an Option Group and attach the option group to AWS RDS, deploy a database from a backup copy, and show you the problem when restoring from MS SQL Management Studio. Now everyone can do it by following these steps.

References

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/UserGuide/SQLServer.Procedural.Importing.html