1811 Dictionary in the Vulgar Tongue: Section X,Y AND Z by@francisgrose

1811 Dictionary in the Vulgar Tongue: Section X,Y AND Z

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1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

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1811 Dictionary in the Vulgar Tongue, by Francis Grose is part of HackerNoon’s Book Blog Post series. You can jump to any chapter in this book here: [LINK TO TABLE OF LINK]. Section X,Y AND Z

Section X,Y AND Z

XANTIPPE. The name of Socrates's wife: now used to signify a shrew or scolding wife.

YAFFLING. Eating. CANT.

TO YAM. To eat or stuff heartily.

YANKEY, or YANKEY DOODLE. A booby, or country
  lout: a name given to the New England men in North
  America. A general appellation for an American.

YARMOUTH CAPON. A red herring: Yarmouth is a
  famous place for curing herrings.

YARMOUTH COACH. A kind of low two-wheeled cart
  drawn by one horse, not much unlike an Irish car.

YARMOUTH PYE. A pye made of herrings highly spiced,
  which the city of Norwich is by charter bound to present
  annually to the king.

YARUM. Milk. CANT.

YEA AND NAY MAN. A quaker, a simple fellow, one who can only answer yes, or no.

YELLOW. To look yellow; to be jealous. I happened to call on Mr. Green, who was out: on coming home, and finding me with his wife, he began to look confounded blue, and was, I thought, a little yellow.

YELLOW BELLY. A native of the Fens of Lincolnshire; an allusion to the eels caught there.

YELLOW BOYS. Guineas.

TO YELP. To cry out. Yelper; a town cryer, also one apt to make great complaints on trifling occasions.

YEST. A contraction of yesterday.

YOKED. Married. A yoke; the quantum of labour performed at one spell by husbandmen, the day's work being divided in summer into three yokes. Kentish term.

YORKSHIRE TYKE. A Yorkshire clown. To come Yorkshire over any one; to cheat him.

YOUNG ONE. A familiar expression of contempt for another's ignorance, as "ah! I see you're a young one." How d'ye do, young one?

TO YOWL. To cry aloud, or howl.

ZAD. Crooked like the letter Z. He is a mere zad, or perhaps zed; a description of a very crooked or deformed person.

ZANY. The jester, jack pudding, or merry andrew, to a
  mountebank.

ZEDLAND. Great part of the west country, where the
  letter Z is substituted for S; as zee for see, zun for sun,

About HackerNoon Book Series: We bring you the most important technical, scientific, and insightful public domain books. This book is part of the public domain.

Grose, Francis. 2004. 1881 Dictionary in the Vulgar Tongue. Urbana, Illinois: Project Gutenberg. Retrieved April 2022 from https://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/5402/pg5402.html

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org, located at https://www.gutenberg.org/policy/license.html.

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